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Leonardo da Vinci for Biography Kids: Religious Paintings

March 23, 2013 by  
Filed under Art History, Artists Biographies

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We will talk about Leonardo da Vinci for Biography Kids: Religious Paintings. Leonardo lived in Italy during the Renaissance, in those days the Catholic Church was the major patron of the arts. Leonardo received many commissions to paint religious paintings,he never finished many of them, some were damaged, and some are lost forever.

This article is part of my series about Leonardo da Vinci where you will find information about his life, facts and anecdotes of his science and artistic activities and his inventions.

These fully illustrated series are especially design for kids, to give them a complete understanding about his work. Please check our archive in the link below to have access to all the articles related to Leonardo da Vinci.

 Welcome to leonardo da Vinci wonderful life, please remember to leave your comments and questions below.

Leonardo da Vinci religious painting for kids

Leonardo’s first Known religious painting is “The Baptism of Christ.” He  only painted the angel on the left and probably the background. The rest of the painting was made by his master Verrocchio

Leonardo da Vinci religious paintings

Between 1475 and 1480 when he was still very young and worked as a pupil of Verrocchio, Leonardo completed his first accepted painting: “The Annunciation.” Oil and tempera on poplar panel 98 × 217 cm Florence, Uffizi

Between 1475 and 1480 when he was still very young and worked as a pupil of Verrocchio, Leonardo completed his first accepted painting: “The Annunciation.” Oil and tempera on poplar panel 98 × 217 cm Florence, Uffizi

Between 1475 and 1480 when he was still very young and worked as a pupil of Verrocchio, Leonardo completed his first accepted painting: “The Annunciation.” Oil and tempera on poplar panel 98 × 217 cm Florence, Uffizi

Between 1475 and 1480 when he was still very young and worked as a pupil of Verrocchio, Leonardo completed his first accepted painting: “The Annunciation.” Oil and tempera on poplar panel 98 × 217 cm Florence, Uffizi

 

“Madonna of the Carnation” 1476 Tempera and oil on poplar panel 62 × 47.5 cm Munich, Alte Pinakothek

“Madonna of the Carnation” 1476 Tempera and oil on poplar panel 62 × 47.5 cm Munich, Alte Pinakothek

Study of the Madonna and Child with a Cat, 1478 28.1 x 19.9 cm London, British Museum

“The Adoration of the Magi

“The Adoration of the Magi” Detail Oil (under painting) on wood panel 240 × 250 cm, 96 × 97 in Florence, Uffizi

“St. Jerome in the Wilderness” Tempera and oil on walnut panel 103 × 75 cm, 41 × 30 in Vatican Museums

“Madonna Litta” Tempera and oil? on poplar panel 42 × 33 cm St Petersburg, Hermitage

“The Virgin and Child with St. Anne” Oil on wood panel 168 × 112 cm, 66.1 × 44.1 in Paris, Louvre

“The Virgin and Child with St Anne and St John the Baptist” Charcoal, black and white chalk on tinted paper, mounted on canvas 142 × 105 cm, 55.7 × 41.2 in London, National Gallery

“The Virgin and Child with St Anne and St John the Baptist” Charcoal, black and white chalk on tinted paper, mounted on canvas 142 × 105 cm, 55.7 × 41.2 in London, National Gallery

“The Virgin of the Rocks” Oil on poplar panel 189.5 × 120 cm, 74.6 × 47.25 in London, National Gallery

detail. “The Virgin of the Rocks” Oil on poplar panel 189.5 × 120 cm, 74.6 × 47.25 in London, National Gallery

Detail. “The Virgin of the Rocks” Oil on poplar panel 189.5 × 120 cm, 74.6 × 47.25 in London, National Gallery

St. John the Baptist Oil on walnut panel 69 × 57 cm, 27.2 × 22.4 in Paris, Louvre

 

 

 

 

 

 

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